Skip to main content

About your Search

( more )
English 55
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenge for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state, you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the house killed the bill -- ho
for authority and put you into an environment where those things are not held in regard and i was ridiculed. i was harassed, teachers pet, talking like a white boy, all these things are not made. the irony was the only reason it didn't taste too likely kids at the school took a liking to me and defended me they are much bigger than anyone else. i might've been held back a couple grades. but it is going through that experience and realizing there was all this animosity when it came to not just race, but the whole archetype of what it meant to be black. i talk about what it means to be authentically like in someone who believes in the dignity and work of every individual and how that individual was named in the image of god, i take exception that there's a standard that says this is what it means to be black and anyone who doesn't fit in to this box can possibly be black. jesse jackson a couple years ago saying you can't be against the president's health care plan and call yourself black. why not? last time i looked in the mirror i qualified. so the whole experience i had an outlet near with a c
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them.'s my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus with reporting from the front lines. today on the two-year anniversary of the egyptian revolution that ousted hosni mubarak from power, the streets were filled not with peace but with violence. protesters for and against president mohamed morsi clashed with police, at least seven died. morsi did not address the country but tweeted on twitter. he called on people to uphold the noble principles of the revolution. >>> apple is no longer the world's biggest company. the title belongs to exxonmobil. apple shares plummeted on the heels of disappointing earnings resulted and plunged over 12%. apple's market cap first passed exxonmobil on august 9th, 2011. it's been sitting pretty 18 months, seemingly untouchable. tonight it is
the president's proposals in some is cases but work to make them better in others. >>> bad for the environment or good for job creation? the fate of the controversial keystone pipeline rests with the administration now. i will talk about that with a republican senator from idaho. plus, a reality show of a very different kind. >> women are petrified and ashamed and scared that their secret will come out. >> a new christian series follows five women struggling with grief and guilt. fox's lauren green tells us why, after the break. [ male announcer ] with over 50 delicious choices of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >> shannon: it is a first for reality television. a christian show that follows several women after their decision to have an abortion. lauren green has more. >> women are petrified and ashamed and scared that their secret will come out. >> but you here they will surrender the secret. it is the name of the first ever reality show about women in a bible study trying to recover from the built they feel
interest-rate environment created by the fed and also the money environment. that is why crude prices continue to rise with the stock market despite the weak economic data we have at hand. look at your other energy products on the session. natural gas has been a big winner in the face of cold weather temperatures, natural gas prices down slightly on the session. foyour wholesale gasoline price. gasoline prices have been rising up above $0.10 over the past month and are starting to catch up with those higher oil prices, so if you're worried about those gasoline prices at the pump, we're starting to see them come up in line with those oil and stock market prices. back to you guys. lori: that is fantastic news. melissa: bad news at the pump especially if you live in california with crude oil prices spiking, california motorist paying an average of $3.77 per gallon. it is the average. with refineries switching to costlier summer blend, voters could soon see $4. national gas prices currently average $3.42, up from $3.29 a month ago. matt smith is a commodity analyst here with more on what
create a totally secure environment for him in benghazi on september 10 and 11? >> no. the number of diplomatic security personnel requested in the cables is five. there were five there that night. with him. plus there was a mutual understanding with the annex that had a much more heavily armed presence because of the work they were doing in the region. it is very difficult to, in retrospect, to really anticipate what might have been. one of the r.s.o.'s who had served in libya said the kind of attack the compound suffered had not been anticipated. we had gotten used to preparing for car bombs and suicide bombings and things like that but this was of a different nature. and we even saw that at the annex, which was much more heavily fort fid, had much more heavy military equipment, we lost two of our best and had one of our diplomatic security officers badly injured. he's still at walter reed. so even the annex which had more assets in the face of the attack was suffering losses that night. >> thank you very much. >> mr. moreno of pennsylvania. >> good afternoon, madam speaker -- m
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them.'s my job to look after it. ♪
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them.'s my job to look after it. ♪ >>> we are back with tonight's "outer circle" where we reach out to sources around the world. we go to south africa where the search is on for thousands of crocodiles near the botswana border. rising floodwaters were threatening about 15,000 crocs on a breeding farm. the owners opened the farm's gates to relieve pressure. more than half the crocs or the loose. maybe that's good because they're not going to be turned into handbags. robyn curnow is following the story. >> reporter: fair to say the people who are trying to round up the crocs are doing it carefully. we understand the recapturing the mostly taking place at nighttime because crocodiles eyes grow red when lights reflected into them. in this largely farming rural area, residents are being warned not to try and capture the crocodiles by grabbing hold of their ta
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them.'s my job to look after it. ♪ obfusc . >>> ryan's new budget is not the only really, really odd fight that republicans are about to pick. they have another one, in this one, they threaten to cut the spending they like unless democrats cut the spending they like first. if that does not make sense to you, you are not alone. and the bust that is the filibuster effort, that is coming up. cord scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you. it just tastes that way. [ female announcer ] honey nut cheerios cereal -- heart-healthy, whole grain oats. you can't go wrong loving it. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robitussin®. don't suffer the coughequences™. >> i'm going to ask you to bear with me for a second, becaus
to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them.'s my job to look after it. ♪ >>> ryan's new budget is not the only really, really odd fight that republicans are about to pick. they have another one, in this one, they threaten to cut the spending they like unless democrats cut the spending they like first. if that does not make sense to you, you are not alone. and the bust that is the filibuster effort, that is coming up. [ woman ] my boyfriend and i were going on vacation, so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit to apply. if we took the already great sen
to reduce the infrastructure's impact upon the environment. on the front lines of protecting the beaches, are the crews that clean out the stormwater system. man: this big vactor truck works on the same principle as your vacuum cleaner in your house, only this thing sucks up the whole house. some of the storm drains collect a lot of trash. i started cleaning drains in '93. they were horrible because they hadn't been maintained so much. now this is a priority. you have trash, animal waste, and it ends up on our beaches. that is a health risk. that is one of the main reasons why we have to close the beaches after heavy rain. narrator: but even when it's not raining, water still enters the stormwater system, carrying pollutants. here on the west coast, a lot of our storm drain systems are separate from the sanitary sewer system, so if you dump something in the storm drain, it goes right to the ocean untreated. alamillo: we haven't had a major rainstorm in the last year or so yet there's a lot of water in this creek here. i would say 20% of it is natural and the other 80% is runoff. shapiro:
innovation and entrepreneurship. each of us is committed to fostering the kind of environment that supports the private sector and which turns ideas into innovations, innovations into products, products into companies that help create good jobs. under current policy, one way we do that federally is by supporting research and development through the existing r&d tax credit. companies that invest in r&d generate new products which sparks new industries with spillover benefits for all kinds of sectors. that's why there's long been strong bipartisan support for the existing r&d tax credit. by all accounts, it's working. the r&d credit has helped tens of thousands of american companies succeed and create jobs. but there's a critical gap in the existing r&d credit. it isn't available to start-ups because they're not yet profitable. and, thus, they don't have an income tax liability against which to take a credit. in fact, more than half the r&d credit last year was taken by companies with revenue over a billion, well-established, profitable companies. there's nothing wrong with that. it's just no
to a changing political environment." >> first of all, on that comment, it is deeply offensive. democrats did the same thing in 2008. i believe andrew cuomo may have said the same thing in 2008, and he was -- >> got a pass. >> yeah. he was not hammered as much. >> he got hammered for that? i read that someone got a pass for it. >> some have gotten a pass. anyway, i think cuomo got hammered pretty hard. but this is -- i saw, richard haass, mr. i'm not going to speculate on anything that's not in front of my nose, you know, this is important. this is an important story because the guy who has been the de facto leader of the republican party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker
of the pressure of lawsuits, pressure of the regulatory environment, the cost, what should investors expect in terms of that pressure this year? can you say that's behind or still dealing with these things? >> we still work through lawsuits on mortgage-backed security side and other areas. but compared to what we have gone through the last few years, it is largely behind us. >> have you been surprised at the move in your stock as well as the interest in banks over the last year? >> our stock was up over 100% last year and that's, you know, i think was a performance reflecting in the capital and the uncertainties around capital levels and things like that, that came through during the year. but we got the best franchise in the business. we have great earnings power. it has been covered up and you see the last couple of quarters, by putting away a few of the things that happened in the past. we're very confident that as that comes through, the people see the value in this company. >> we'll be watching eagerly. thanks very much. >> thank you. >> we appreciate it. brian moynihan joining us. car
through. it was not a matter of their qualifications so much as the environment in which they were placed, which is not of their doing. their chain of command did not of of going through all of the level steps. they went to the wing commander. that is not something they did, that was something externally placed. that is my concern. the people in the periphery that want to see certain amounts, certain numbers of women in certain jobs, they may or may not be qualified. if they are not, they should not be in the job. i am concerned that somebody will say, they have to be in the job because our program, the inclusion of women demands it. then you start eroding or chipping away at the qualification issue. that, to be quite honest, is my biggest concern. not with the women can do. not what they are qualified to do. what people outside of the program thing should be done. host: i want to make sure i understand. when these women first came through as a pilot trainees, they had a different chain of command than their male trainee counterplots? caller: it was not anything written down on paper. if
is stronger, maybe they're worried about issues related to the environment. these are not issues that republicans like to talk about. they're not issues that are good at talking about. this is where it emerged in the late 1990's from a time when bill clinton had been something republicans up and down washington. the whole point of bush was to craft a republican party that had something to say about education. something like the prescription drug bill was too big and should have been paid for. the republican party will never give back to the wilderness. we have to keep our brand pure and make sure americans and no where the party of small government. americans are confident that the republican party is the party's small government. they did not vote for the republican party. it is possible that he should not nominate mitt romney next time and get a true conservative, if you look at opinion polls, barack obama won the election because people thought he cared about people like us. that is a touchy-feely kind of sentiment. it is the kind of sentiment that republican politicians have
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
inches from your comrade's face. now, introducing women into that environment can be really traumtic and humiliating. and combat's already difficult enough. you don't need to add this other layer. >> congress wam tulsi gabbard of hawaii, also an iraqi war vet, had news for mr. smith. >> well, ryan, i respect you and thank you for your service. i've been honored to serve with many women who've already operated under these circumstances. this is not something new. some of the things that you've described are things that i and friends of mine and people that i've served with have already experienced. >> joining us tonight, goldie taylor, msnbc contributor, managing editor of the goldie taylor project and former marine. goldie, thank you for your time tonight. your response to some of the rhetoric you just heard. >> i frankly just find it astounding. you know, women have been serving in our armed forces and in military operations around the world for decades. the fact is we're doing the job. we're helicopter pilots. we're marine corps, you know, military police officers. we're military i
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
, was a hospitable governmental environment. you had a taxation and a regulatory environment which allowed me to prosper with the sec making sure the rules were followed, and it encouraged entrepreneurship. people were respected for the fact that they added to the economy. and now that i have wealth, i can do a lot more to help poor people than i could when i didn't have wealth. my wife scrubbed the floors, sewed the kids' clothes, cut my hair, and now we are blessed by this american dream. so i want to help keep that alive for others. and, of course, the third ingredient is the entrepreneur which is a role that i played. so those three things, entrepreneur, has hospitable government environment and the workers are what creates success in america, and we have to do everything to keep those three legs of that stool strong and vibrant. >> let me -- thank you for the opening statement. let me ask you one or two, and then we'll go around the table. um, especially interested to hear you talk about helping obama create his legacy. earlier this week, as you probably know, speaker boehner spoke and s
. to do it in the environment of these big gun shows, which are basically a giant gun shop with many dealers real hi doesn't add anything to it. as police chief johnson said, it takes a minute or two to go through the background check. the second thing is that the whole point of the exercise is that it keeps the criminal from coming in and buying guns. so when mr. lapierre says, well, you know, this is no good because criminals won't subject themselves to a background check, that's precisely the point. >> sure. what was the feeling in the room from you and your colleagues after hearing gabby giffords speak today? how much of an impact do you think she had? >> i think she had a real impact. i think the other moment of real impact was when her husband, captain kelly, talked about the child at gabrielle giffords' shooting who was killed by the 13th bullet, and pointed out that if the shooter hadn't had that high capacity magazine, before he got to that 13th bullet, he would have had to reload. and that shooting came to an end when the shooter had to reload. so the moment when you have 2
and now i'm in a very good environment and there are a lot of things to be done and that i'd like to do so i have to be very engaged. it's a very, very full of things to do and i'm very happy about that. >> suarez: are you able to keep up with events in china as closely as you were when you were doing your human rights work there? >> (translated): there are many ways to get -- to become informed. in a sense, it's easier to be informed here than when i was in china. i'm not saying that in china things cannot be done. what i'm saying is that things can be done from many different angles to promote what we need to promote. >> suarez: well, since you left the country there have been continued arrests of dissidents, suppression of press freedoms with the southern weekly, attempts to control access to the internet. a lot of things are moving along in china. what does it tell you about the government's attitude toward free speech and free thought? >> (translated): i think this only goes to show that the chinese government and the party still wants to control everything and if they keep holding an
. certainly they were. but he was in a crisis environment from the moment he stepped in. his approach was to enact the biggest tax increase in the country and the biggest in connecticut history. at the same time he was doing that he was making budget cuts. there was a real flight with public employee unions in canada as a kid. -- a real fight with public employee unions in connecticut. he really had some hard choices to make over the last couple of years. connecticut stands out. host: here is a recent story from "usa today," -- let us talk about the mandates states have to balance their budgets. here is from. how significant is that? guest: the wasted governments -- it is very significant. state governments could not say that we would put these bills on. they have ways around balanced budget requirement. there are ways to make the budget look balanced on paper without being really balance. they cannot act in a countercyclical way, spend money when things did bad. they tend to cut money when things did that in the economy. then it drags itself on the economy. that is why you have the f
says the murder of a dozen children changed the political environment. >> sandy hook, i think, really destroys all of the kind of tales that the nra is trying to weave about young people and guns. guns are positive things in the climate of america. >> reporter: feinstein of course was the author of the 199 assault weapons ban which was not renewed after it expired 10 years later, jamie. jamie: the one we've been hearing most about is the vice president who has been leading the administration's push for these new gun laws. what is he up to? >> reporter: biden is a former prosecutor. he is the author of violence against women act. he held a couple events last week including google plus hankout and roundtable at virginia commonwealth university. his criticism of assault weapons that they put police at disadvantage. cops find themselves outgunned. new york city police commissioner ray kelley said he would like an assault weapons ban but he said handguns is the big problem. >> we don't want them on the streets, make no mistake about it. but the problem is the handgun. 60% of the murders in
't confirm that they did it. there's a new environment in that region. before i let you go, north korea is threatening another underground nuclear test. how credible is this threat? >> it's very credible. we have seen in the past that they have used this to their political advantage. the chinese have put pressure on them at their u.s. request. that's a good thing. >> to not do it? >> to not do it. however, they are pushing the envelope and i believe that this is this new, young leader who's decided that he needs to show that he's in charge, gain the credibility from the military and if that means further isolation through a nuclear test, i think he'll do it. >> kim jong-un. the next day he's launching a missile or threatening a nuclear test underground. i don't know which direction he's moving. >> i think he believes that he needs to get the supporter to prove that he's a hard liner and a leader and will continue -- the only way to do well in that country is being part of the military infrastructure and so he needs to keep that loyal if he's going to stay in charge. i think what you're
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
are but a manifestation of the brilliance of nature to enable us to adapt to the environment in which we evolved, that somehow these characteristics determine our innate worth and value as human beings. that is the essence of racism. but that system was not cultivated into every intellectual commercial, judicial, religious philosophical medical system that we have. the imbalances you see in the country today -- i call them inequities' -- are but reflections of that deep-seated belief. is it conscious in most of us? no. in some of us, yes. i understand the ku klux klan was going to have a rally. some people consciously adhere to that belief. but most of us have been swept up in it and we do not even know it. it is easy to be at the top and never have to think about it. it is impossible to be on the bottom and not think about that on a daily basis and not internalize the absurdity of the devaluation of your humanity on a daily basis. my lovely daughter once said to me, "how did the story of african-americans get inverted into a story of victimization only? how is that story and not a story of triu
the right environment is the most important. how we can create this environment today with this kind of unstability, we need political stability. we need peace. we have struggle between the palestinians and israelis and egypt. we have to talk about it and be very frank to see how we can get to the end of this. for this reason, yes, frankly speaking i'm not very optimistic about all today. if i ask anyone what you want me to talk to about, talk about democracy, freedom, transparency, governments, rulers. let us work for this and this is very important. >> let me ask --, let me ask someone who has worked with some of these institutions under the most ex-rd nary conditions. you have helped functioning institution in the west bank. you created an economy that created extraordinary growth over the last three years and you've done it under very adverse circumstances. so what would be your advice to people trying to build these institutions? >> thank you. honestly i continue to the effort help the institutions not just myself and to get ready for the emergence of fully independent and state
the audience that everything is fine, the global environment is not threatened. the critics jumped here is the guy who just sold current tv to al-jazeera getting undetermined amount of funding from the country of qatar that gets money from oil reserves. >> isn't there a contradiction in that. >> i understand the criticism. i disagree with that. al-jazeera has long since established itself as a really distinguished and effective news gathering organization. >> but funding from a company that bases its wealth on fossil fuels and fossil fuels are the enemy you target in climate change. isn't there a bit of hypocrisy in that. >> i get the criticism. i just disagree with it because this network has established itself. it is objective. it's in countries around the world. the climate coverage has been outstanding and expensive. >>> he was a congressional investigator and has been a political activist for over a decade now. wow. he gets the criticism. he just disagrees with it because al-jazeera is such a distinguished effective nuss gathering information whose climate coverage he likes. is tha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)